From the LA Times: Link California’s clean energy to the rest of the west? Sounds great, but it’s risky

Earlier this week the Editorial Board at the Los Angeles Times wrote the following:

Link California’s clean energy to the rest of the west? Sounds great, but it’s risky

By THE TIMES EDITORIAL BOARD

JUL 02, 2018

The state of California is considering forming a regional electrical grid to jointly manage power transmission in multiple western states, and the potential benefits are enormous: It would provide a gigantic new market for California utilities to sell the overabundance of solar power they generate

Coal in the Western United States

during the day, as well as giving them access to an equally generous array of hydroelectric- and wind-generated electricity from other states to power the lights when the sun sets over the Pacific Ocean.

Electricity rates would plunge, supporters say, given that the fuel for clean power is free and infinitely self-renewing. Coal plants and natural gas couldn’t compete over the long run and would shut down because, really, who wants to pay extra for dirty air? And eventually the big western skies would be as clear and carbon-free as they were before the first wagon rattled along the Oregon Trail. Best of all, despite the persistent efforts of the climate change deniers running the federal government, the U.S. would be a leader in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Take that, Mr. President!

That’s the pretty picture painted by the people (one of whom is Gov. Jerry Brown) pushing the California Legislature to vote this summer to dissolve the California Independent System Operator, the entity that runs the state’s electrical grid, and replace it with a new regional organization that would buy and distribute electricity among any western states and utilities that want to participate.

But like any big payout, it requires taking a gamble. And right now ratepayer advocates, consumer groups, municipal utilities and some environmental groups say the risks are too great. (Other environmental groups are supporting the big grid proposal because of the potential to spur more states to make the transition to renewables.)

The proposal’s biggest risk is that California would have to hand over control of its power grid to an as-yet unknown entity, sacrificing the safeguards put into place two decades ago after another such gamble — on deregulation — triggered an electricity crisis that plunged the power grid into chaos.

Right now, Cal-ISO is a nonprofit public benefit corporation with board members appointed by the governor and confirmed by the state Senate. And in addition to adhering to state open-meeting laws and procedural rules, it must operate in the best interests of Californians — not of, say, Utahns, who have already expressed hostility toward California’s climate change policies and their effects on coal revenues. The bill says that the new board must also follow the state’s rules or else California will take its power grid and go home. That’s easier said than done once the state has already signed over management of its infrastructure to a board answerable not to Californians, but to President Trump’s appointees on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Proponents are also worried about a not-inconceivable scenario in which California would be forced to subsidize coal-power plants within the regional market to help Trump achieve one of his campaign promises.

The Legislature should not pass this plan, at least not right now and not in its current form. Under the proposal, the Legislature would give its blessing to the development of a governing board to oversee the regional market without knowing its composition or structure. (The bill specifies that there would be a western states committee with three members from each state to provide unspecified “guidance” to the governing board.) Final details would be worked out later and approved by the California Energy Commission. It’s troubling that the measure provides no mechanism for the Legislature to pull out if the plan evolves into something that may not be in the state’s best interests.

There’s no ticking clock here. California isn’t in danger of falling behind in its green power goals. In fact, it is well on track to have half its power come from renewable sources by 2030, as mandated by state law. Nor is there reason to think renewable power won’t catch on if there’s no regional market. Solar- and wind-generated electricity is getting cheaper every year. Someday — possibly very soon — an interconnected multi-state regional electric grid may be the safest and most sensible way to go for the next phase of clean power. But the risks are simply greater than the need at the moment.

Link to editorial here.

2018 Energy & Sustainability Summit

Leadership in an Era of Rollbacks & Setbacks

Overview
In 2017, after years of forward progress, the globe took a step backward as some of the world’s most important environmental protections were loosened and jeopardized. At the same time, last year saw the global transition to clean energy intensify as well as a renewed focus on public-private partnerships to advance environmental sustainability.
With the cost of renewables continuing to fall at an unprecedented rate, policy makers and business leaders increasingly feel emboldened to advance concrete commitments and work to accelerate climate action, even in the face of determined efforts to prolong the inevitable transition to clean energy. While the U.S. government pulled out of the Paris Agreement, American businesses resoundingly said “We’re still in”, and over 50 U.S. cities put forward ambitious timetables for getting to 100% clean energy.
Business is also advancing environmental sustainability and looking to increase profitability while reducing dependence on natural resources in a constrained world. Additionally, companies are looking to align their corporate strategy with the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals; realizing the SDGs, it’s projected, could create upwards of 350 million jobs and opportunities worth $12 trillion across a range of sectors.

Join Us on May 24! Silicon Valley Energy & Sustainability Summit 2018
Join us on May 24 at Oracle to learn about the latest policy and regulatory developments and to explore how to employ the latest innovative technologies and practices to create lasting value and explore what you can do on a practical level to prepare for an evolving landscape. The 6th Annual Silicon Valley Energy and Sustainability Summit will include C-Suite plenaries, policy round tables and case studies, all focused on the business case for clean and efficient energy, environmental sustainability, water conservation and climate action. The event brings together policy experts, elected and appointed officials, business executives and NGO leaders for a series of thoughtful and engaging discussions.

From The Energy Collective: Wind/Solar Expansion Will Require Perpetual Subsidies

Wind/Solar Expansion Will Require Perpetual Subsidies

Highlights:

  • Wind/solar advocates point to continued cost reductions due to technological learning.
  • Wind/solar opponents point to continued value declines due to intermittency.
  • It tuns out that these two effects cancel out fairly evenly.
  • Wind and solar will thus remain as subsidy-dependent as they are today.

Introduction

There can be no doubt that wind and solar power will be important players in the energy system of the future. Over the past decade or so, these sources have grown almost as fast as nuclear power did in the seventies (see below). Since 2010, wind and solar have achieved an almost perfectly linear expansion of about 5.5% of global electricity production per decade (2.3% of global primary energy per decade).

Although wind and solar are settled as important energy players, the magnitude of their contribution to the future energy system is a topic of vigorous debate. The advocate camp points to the continued cost declines of these technologies, often claiming that wind/solar power will soon achieve competitiveness without subsidies, spelling the end of conventional power sources. The following graphs from IRENA for wind and solar illustrate this argument.

The complete article can be found here.