City allegedly misused anniversary event money

This is disturbing on so many levels. Calexico needs to do something about the mayor misappropriating funds that were meant for the City’s 100th anniversary. Reminds me of the scandal the police department had a few years ago when the FBI was confiscating files. Maybe law enforcement should be looking at this…

Read the story by Roy Dorantes (below) that was posted on the KYMA website on August 24 yourself, and be sure to watch the video by clicking here. Additionally, please call Calexico City and ask for a copy of the report (hope I see it on Facebook soon!).  Their number is (760) 768-2110.

City allegedly misused anniversary event money

CALEXICO, Calif. – A Calexico economic commissioner said the city used funds collected for the city’s 110th anniversary in April for other events not part of the celebration.

Commissioner Ben Horton said, “Financed the Mayor’s Summit which ran up to about $3,638 which the public was not aware of this, which the public was not permitted to be involved with.”

Calexico Mayor Maritza Hurtado

A Calexico city official who didn’t want to be named admits some money donated for the anniversary was used for the mayor’s conference. An event closed to the public, but he said it was approved by the sponsor who donated the funds. He showed us an email as proof.

Horton questions why the community was not informed of that.

“The public was under the impression that this money was going to be used exclusively for the 110th anniversary.”

The city official also said no city employees worked on the event. Horton disagrees with that statement.

“And then, I find out that city employees were used to work on the event, which originally the 100th event was supposed to be no cost to the city, which there was cost to the city and hours or comp times

Horton questions why the expense list was not made public sooner.

“I would say the public was misled, and they were misled to the point that the money was used for other activities that they were not aware of,” Horton said.

The report that shows how the money was spent item by item is freely available to the public at Calexico City Hall.

Unemployment in Imperial County

The following is from a daily email, The Nooner, by Scott Lay (please note that information has been deleted from the original email for space):

CA ECONOMY: On Friday, we received generally good employment news for the Golden State. The unemployment rate remained steady at 4.2%, That’s a decline of 0.5% from July 2017. July saw a net game on 46,700 net jobs from June. The labor force increase by 113,000, which combined with the unemployment rate, paints a very good picture.

Of the eight economic sectors tracked, only construction (-1,200) and financial services (-900) experienced declines. The top three month-over-month increases were in numbers were professional and business services (15,100), trade, transportation and utilities (11,200), and leisure and hospitality (9,500).

Five counties with the lowest unemployment in July (not seasonally adjusted):

  1. San Mateo: 2.3% (-0.9% from July 2017)
  2. San Francisco: 2.4% (-1.0% from July 2017)
  3. Marin: 2.5% (-0.9% from July 2017)
  4. Napa: 2.9% (-1.0% from July 2017)
  5. Sonoma: 2.9% (-1.0% from July 2017)

Five counties with the highest unemployment in July (not seasonally adjusted):

  1. Imperial: 19.3% (-4.9% from July 2017)
  2. Colusa: 10.5% (-1.1% from July 2017)
  3. Tulare: 9.3% (-1.5% from July 2017)
  4. Kern: 8.1% (-1.6% from July 2017)
  5. Merced: 8.1% (-1.6% from July 2017)

Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia’s Geothermal Energy Proposal Prevails in Senate Appropriations

Sacramento, California – Thursday, in the midst of fevered policy discussions surrounding the fate of California’s clean energy future, Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia successfully advanced AB 893, his proposal supporting geothermal, out of the Senate Committee on Appropriations. The geothermal procurement mandated in this measure is of immense significance to the Riverside and Imperial County communities in Garcia’s district.

“Areas surrounding the Salton Sea are uniquely ripe for renewable energy development, geothermal being chief among them,” stated Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia. “Despite the increased reliability of geothermal, these

The Hudson Ranch geothermal facility

resources have been greatly neglected in energy conversations. I introduced AB 893, to make sure that this tremendous regional opportunity is no longer overlooked and can be integrated into California’s overall energy efforts. In addition to helping diversify our renewable energy portfolio, the inclusion of geothermal would unlock many economic as well as public health co-benefits for underserved areas like ours.”

Read the complete article here:  Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia’s Geothermal Energy Proposal Prevails in Senate Appropriations

Water You Talking About?

Water You Talking About? Climate change is worsening water woes across the world, and these complex problems require solutions that cross borders and go beyond politics. Quartz and the Texas Observer are partnering on a nine-part series, Shallow Waters, that examines how the US and Mexico are working together to confront controversial water issues along the border, sometimes overcoming and sometimes succumbing to political tensions. The first story introduces two key American and Mexican negotiators, and their counterparts in the Middle East who face a similar struggle to cooperate over shared resources. (Introduction; First story: Quartz or Texas Observer)

Who Controls Distribution of the Imperial Valley’s Water?

While looking around the Internet we came across this great article on The Desert Review by Brian McNeece. Please read it as it is a very important take on the water in the Imperial Valley.

Some locals have asked, “What does it matter who controls the water?”  It matters a lot.  Farmers rightly claim that they contribute the majority of value to

Farmland in the Imperial Valley

the local economy. They also claim that if they were to control the water, the Imperial Valley would be in good hands….

If you are one of about 500 farmers here, being in control of the water sounds mighty sweet, but if you’re among the other 179,500 residents of Imperial County, you might want those decisions to be made by elected representatives sworn to uphold the public good.

Link to the article at The Desert Review is here.