The Desert Review: IID and country residents rise up to stop an unwanted solution

The following clip is from an article in The Desert Review, posted on their website on September 28.

IID Director Jim Hanks mentioned during the August 27 meeting in Brawley that the organizations needed to be more careful in their presentations.

“This is why you saw a lot of defensive people here,” Hanks said, referring to the majority of the people in the room. “You were talking about the drinking water, and then you were talking about water in the canals that run off from the fields. Runoff from the fields are not in the canals, those are in the drains.”

The lack of knowledge of Comite Civico investigators of the details of water delivery and water waste from fields led many to doubt the scientific expertise of those gathering information.

The organizations said they planned on using citizen-scientists to provide the data.

IID Water Manager Tina Shields said she questioned the methodology of collecting water samples.

Shields said the proposed study by Comite Civico and the University of Washington failed to employ trained experts to collect accurate samples, and that without proper training, the collectors could even self-contaminate the samples.

The IID went further, claiming the organizations sought to usurp the scientific work local agencies were tasked to conduct. The IID charged that Comite Civico has failed to produce a scope of work for their study.

Many people who attended the informational meetings held in late August questioned the organization staff’s apparent lack of any formal scientific training.

The complete article is available by clicking here.